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ChevronTexaco donates seismic data to American Geological Institute

Posted: 5 March 2005

Seismic data will help enable earth science research

ChevronTexaco Corp and the American Geological Institute (AGI) announced a donation from ChevronTexaco to AGI of thousands of miles of historic 2D and 3D seismic data covering offshore California and portions of the West Coast of the U.S.

In conjunction, AGI has partnered with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to place the data in a newly created repository called the "National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys" (NAMSS) enabling academic, government and industrial researchers, marine geologists and environmental engineers throughout the world to have easy access to the data through a website created by the USGS office (www//walrus.wr.usgs.gov/NAMSS/).

Beginning in the early 1960s ChevronTexaco acquired seismic data to image and evaluate the geologic potential of the west coast U.S. continental shelf for oil and gas.

"Over the decades, the magnetic tapes containing the seismic data have been stored in special warehouses but they are rapidly approaching the point where they will no longer be viable. The data needs to be transferred to a new digital recording medium to preserve this unique, irreplaceable asset, otherwise it will be permanently lost," said Dr. Donald Paul, ChevronTexaco vice president and chief technology officer.

"The data is a valuable resource for understanding the offshore structural geology, marine sedimentation and even the mapping of the complex fault systems associated with earthquakes, particularly in Southern California," said Stephen Testa, president, American Geological Institute.

This data transfer came about through the cooperative efforts of ChevronTexaco, the USGS, and AGI. Bill Kempner, a geophysicist for ChevronTexaco in Bakersfield, California teamed up with Jon Childs, a geophysicist at the USGS, Menlo Park, California, and Christopher Keane, Director of Technology and Communications at the American Geological Institute to come up with a plan to preserve the data and move it into the public domain for future educational and scientific use.

"The earth science research community is already showing a high level of interest in gaining access to these offshore images. The plan is to begin the initial transfer of more than 30,000 tapes immediately. The expectation is that this data resource will enable years of geological and geophysical research to expand our knowledge of the continental shelf area," said Dr. Charles Groat, director, U.S. Geological Survey.

About ChevronTexaco
ChevronTexaco Corp. is one of the world's leading energy companies. With more than 47,000 employees, ChevronTexaco conducts business in approximately 180 countries around the world, producing and transporting crude oil and natural gas, and refining, marketing and distributing fuels and other energy products. ChevronTexaco is based in San Ramon, Calif. More information on ChevronTexaco is available at chevrontexaco.com.

About the American Geological Institute: The American Geological Institute is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit federation of 43 geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 100,000 geologists, geophysicists, and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in our profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources and interaction with the environment.

About the United States Geological Survey
The USGS serves the nation by providing reliable scientific information to: describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life

For more information see www.chevrontexaco.com

 

 
     

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